MN

Dr Mark Neubauer

Assistant Professor

Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

411 Loomis Laboratory
Urbana
IL
61801
United States
PH: 1 (217) 244-3913
Email: [email protected]

Background

Professor Neubauer received his Ph.D from the University of Pennsylvania (2001) after obtaining a bachelor's degree in physics from Kutztown University (1994). After receiving his Ph.D, he worked as a postdoctoral research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2001–2004) and the University of California, San Diego (2004–2007). Professor Neubauer joined the faculty at the University of Illinois in Fall 2007.

Professor Neubauer is an experimental physicist whose research has spanned a diverse set of topics in the study of elementary particles and their interactions. The ultimate goal of this pursuit is to gain a deeper understanding of Nature at its most fundamental level and to elucidate the physics that lies beyond the standard model.

His research began as a Ph.D. student at the University of Pennsylvania working on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment, which was designed to resolve the long-standing deficit of solar ne observed in previous experiments. His Ph.D. thesis, Evidence for neFlavor Change Through Measurement of the 8B Solar n Flux at SNO demonstrated in 2001 that ~2/3 of all solar ne's change flavor (ne®nm,t) before detection on Earth, which can occur if neutrinos have non-zero mass and mixing. This result was published soon thereafter in a Phys. Rev. Lett. article that became the most cited paper in physics in the two years following its publication.

As a postdoctoral fellow at MIT and then UCSD, he conducted research at the current energy frontier provided by proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. As member of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment, he made important contributions to heavy flavor and high-pt physics, including searches for the Higgs boson and new physics. In 2002, he and colleagues at MIT undertook a complete re-design of the CDF analysis computing model, out of which emerged the CDF Analysis Facility (CAF), for which he served as project leader from 2002 to 2004. He played a leading role in the study of electroweak dibosons at CDF as convener of the Diboson Physics Group (2006–2007). In 2006, he led the first-ever observation of WZ diboson production. In 2007, he and colleagues provided the first evidence for ZZ production at a hadron collider and the most stringent limits on Higgs boson production to date (in decay to W boson pairs).

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