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Zecotek’s LFS-3 Scintillation Crystals Being Evaluated for CERN CMS Experiments

Zecotek’s LFS-3 Scintillation Crystals Being Evaluated for CERN CMS Experiments

Zecotek Photonics Inc., a developer of leading-edge photonics technologies for industrial, healthcare and scientific markets, today announced that it is now close to having its patented LFS scintillation crystals approved for use at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. [More]
Cornell Researchers Supply Experimental Proof of 'Cooper Pairs' Theory

Cornell Researchers Supply Experimental Proof of 'Cooper Pairs' Theory

For decades, many physicists have taken for granted a theory that electrons in high-temperature superconductors are nudged into “Cooper pairs” that can carry an electric current without resistance by their interaction with the magnetic fields of nearby atoms. Sensitive measurements at Cornell have finally supplied the first experimental proof of the theory. [More]
‘Quantum Glue’ May Help Create Energy Superhighways

‘Quantum Glue’ May Help Create Energy Superhighways

Physicists have identified the "quantum glue" that underlies a promising type of superconductivity -- a crucial step towards the creation of energy superhighways that conduct electricity without current loss. [More]
Physicists Measure Interaction Between Two Single Electrons After Neutralizing Magnetic Noise

Physicists Measure Interaction Between Two Single Electrons After Neutralizing Magnetic Noise

Imagine trying to measure a tennis ball that bounces wildly, every time to a distance a million times its own size. The bouncing obviously creates enormous "background noise" that interferes with the measurement. But if you attach the ball directly to a measuring device, so they bounce together, you can eliminate the noise problem. [More]
Local Hot Bubble of Gas Dominates Diffuse X-ray Emission

Local Hot Bubble of Gas Dominates Diffuse X-ray Emission

When we look up to the heavens on a clear night, we see an immense dark sky with uncountable stars. With a small telescope we can also see galaxies, nebulae, and the disks of planets. If you look at the sky with an X-ray detector, you would see many of these same familiar objects; in addition, you would see the whole sky glowing brightly with X-rays. This glow is called the "diffuse X-ray background." [More]
Superconductivity May Be Realized in Atom-Thick Stacks of Sheetlike Crystals

Superconductivity May Be Realized in Atom-Thick Stacks of Sheetlike Crystals

An elusive state of matter called superconductivity could be realized in stacks of sheetlike crystals just a few atoms thick, a trio of physicists has determined. [More]
Source of ‘Diffuse X-Ray Background’ Comes from Both Inside and Outside the Solar System

Source of ‘Diffuse X-Ray Background’ Comes from Both Inside and Outside the Solar System

In findings that help astrophysicists understand our corner of the galaxy, an international research team has shown that the soft X-ray glow blanketing the sky comes from both inside and outside the solar system. [More]
Comet Siding Spring Heading Towards a Close Flyby of Mars

Comet Siding Spring Heading Towards a Close Flyby of Mars

NASA is taking steps to protect its Mars orbiters, while preserving opportunities to gather valuable scientific data, as Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring heads toward a close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19. [More]
Physicist Receives W.M. Keck Foundation Grant to Develop Quantum Enhanced Plasmonic Sensor

Physicist Receives W.M. Keck Foundation Grant to Develop Quantum Enhanced Plasmonic Sensor

A University of Oklahoma physicist has received a $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to develop a quantum enhanced plasmonic sensor. [More]
NIFS Achieves 100,000 Amperes Electrical Current Using Yttrium-Based High-Temperature Superconducting Tapes

NIFS Achieves 100,000 Amperes Electrical Current Using Yttrium-Based High-Temperature Superconducting Tapes

The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), of the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) in Japan, has achieved an electrical current of 100,000 amperes, which is by far the highest in the world, by using the new idea of assembling the state-of-the-art yttrium-based high-temperature superconducting tapes to fabricate a large-scale magnet conductor. [More]
Very Low Water Vapour Levels Measured on Jupiter-Like Planets

Very Low Water Vapour Levels Measured on Jupiter-Like Planets

A team of astronomers has made the most precise measurements yet of water vapour in the atmospheres of Jupiter-like planets beyond our Solar System and found them to be much drier worlds than expected. [More]
Topological Insulators May Be Used to Control Magnetic Memory and Logic Devices

Topological Insulators May Be Used to Control Magnetic Memory and Logic Devices

A new phase of matter known as topological insulators, until recently known only for esoteric quantum-mechanical properties, might have a practical use in controlling magnetic memory and logic devices. [More]
Hubble Enables Most Precise Mass Map of Distant Galaxy Cluster

Hubble Enables Most Precise Mass Map of Distant Galaxy Cluster

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have mapped the mass within a galaxy cluster more precisely than ever before. Created using observations from Hubble's Frontier Fields observing programme, the map shows the amount and distribution of mass within MCS J0416.1–2403, a massive galaxy cluster found to be 160 trillion times the mass of the Sun. [More]
Continuous Injection with Energy Can Cause Non-Equilibrium Particle Structures to Self-Organize

Continuous Injection with Energy Can Cause Non-Equilibrium Particle Structures to Self-Organize

Although most natural and synthetic processes prefer to settle into equilibrium—a state of unchanging balance without potential or energy—it is within the realm of non-equilibrium conditions where new possibilities lie. [More]
AIP Honors Caltech Scientist with 2014 Andrew Gemant Award

AIP Honors Caltech Scientist with 2014 Andrew Gemant Award

The American Institute of Physics (AIP) today announced that Sean Carroll, a physicist at the California Institute of Technology, is the winner of the 2014 Andrew Gemant Award, an annual prize recognizing significant contributions to the cultural, artistic or humanistic dimension of physics. [More]

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