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Scientists Measure Intrinsic Angular Momentum and Parity of Sub-Atomic Particle Lambda

Scientists Measure Intrinsic Angular Momentum and Parity of Sub-Atomic Particle Lambda

First identified more than 50 years ago, the sub-atomic particle called Lambda(1405) was routinely seen in experiments, yet two of its key characteristics were too difficult to measure. For the first time, scientists measured these descriptors, intrinsic angular momentum and parity. [More]
As Liquid Water Becomes Supercooled it Does Not Become Completely Unstable

As Liquid Water Becomes Supercooled it Does Not Become Completely Unstable

Water behaves in mysterious ways. Especially below zero, where it is dubbed supercooled water, before it turns into ice. Physicists have recently observed the spontaneous first steps of the ice formation process, as tiny crystal clusters as small as 15 molecules start to exhibit the recognisable structural pattern of crystalline ice. [More]
Remote Galaxy Shines with Light of More Than 300 Trillion Suns

Remote Galaxy Shines with Light of More Than 300 Trillion Suns

A remote galaxy shining with the light of more than 300 trillion suns has been discovered using data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The galaxy is the most luminous galaxy found to date and belongs to a new class of objects recently discovered by WISE -- extremely luminous infrared galaxies, or ELIRGs. [More]
Surprising New Clues About Hefty, Rapidly Aging 'Nasty1' Star

Surprising New Clues About Hefty, Rapidly Aging 'Nasty1' Star

Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered surprising new clues about a hefty, rapidly aging star whose behavior has never been seen before in our Milky Way galaxy. In fact, the star is so weird that astronomers have nicknamed it "Nasty 1," a play on its catalog name of NaSt1. The star may represent a brief transitory stage in the evolution of extremely massive stars. [More]
Giant Particle Physics Projects Discover New Decay Mode of Sub-Atomic Particle

Giant Particle Physics Projects Discover New Decay Mode of Sub-Atomic Particle

Combining their experimental data in a collaboration including EPFL, two giant particle physics projects have discovered a new decay mode of a sub-atomic particle, which has been looked for during the past 25 years. This discovery severely constrains physics beyond the Standard Model. [More]
Advanced LIGO Project: Australian Scientists Begin Hunt for Gravitational Waves

Advanced LIGO Project: Australian Scientists Begin Hunt for Gravitational Waves

Australian scientists are in the hunt for the last missing piece of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, gravitational waves, as the Advanced LIGO Project in the United States comes on line. [More]
Some Type Ia Supernovae May Arise from Single Degenerate Channel

Some Type Ia Supernovae May Arise from Single Degenerate Channel

Type Ia supernovae are violent stellar explosions that shine as some of the brightest objects in the universe. But there are still many mysteries surrounding their origin--what kind of star system they originate in and how the explosions begin. [More]
Early Death Throes of Supernovae Captured for the First Time

Early Death Throes of Supernovae Captured for the First Time

Scientists have captured the early death throes of supernovae for the first time and found that the universe's benchmark explosions are much more varied than expected. [More]
Supercomputer Simulations Help Observe Light Flash Caused by Supernova Slamming into Nearby Star

Supercomputer Simulations Help Observe Light Flash Caused by Supernova Slamming into Nearby Star

Type Ia supernovae are famous for their consistency. Ironically, new observations suggest that their origins may not be uniform at all. Using a “roadmap” of theoretical calculations and supercomputer simulations, astronomers observed for the first time a flash of light caused by a supernova slamming into a nearby star, allowing them to determine the stellar system from which the supernova was born. [More]
SLAC Setting up Test Stand for LUX-ZEPLIN Dark Matter Experiment

SLAC Setting up Test Stand for LUX-ZEPLIN Dark Matter Experiment

Researchers have come a step closer to building one of the world’s best dark matter detectors: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently signed off on the conceptual design of the proposed LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment and gave the green light for the procurement of some of its components. [More]
SID Display Week 2015: Quantum Materials to Introduce New Class of High-Reliability Cadmium-Free Quantum Dots

SID Display Week 2015: Quantum Materials to Introduce New Class of High-Reliability Cadmium-Free Quantum Dots

Leading North American quantum dot manufacturer Quantum Materials Corp today announced plans to introduce a new class of high-reliability Cadmium-free quantum dots at the Society of Information Display (SID) Display Week 2015 International Symposium in San Jose June 1st. [More]
Spiral Galaxy Leaves Evidence of Past Galactic Snacks

Spiral Galaxy Leaves Evidence of Past Galactic Snacks

A team of Australian and Spanish astronomers have caught a greedy galaxy gobbling on its neighbours and leaving crumbs of evidence about its dietary past. [More]
International Project to Find Direct Evidence of Gravitational Waves

International Project to Find Direct Evidence of Gravitational Waves

An international project involving Cardiff University researchers, set up to find the first direct evidence of the existence of gravitational waves, will be officially inaugurated at a ceremony in the US today [19 May 2015]. [More]
Researchers Evaluate Thermoelectric Performance of Two Quantum Dot Models

Researchers Evaluate Thermoelectric Performance of Two Quantum Dot Models

Just as alchemists always dreamed of turning common metal into gold, their 19th century physicist counterparts dreamed of efficiently turning heat into electricity, a field called thermoelectrics. Such scientists had long known that in conducting materials the flow of energy in the form of heat is accompanied by a flow of electrons. [More]
Simulation Explains Collision Between Two Clusters Of Galaxies

Simulation Explains Collision Between Two Clusters Of Galaxies

Tom Broadhurst, the Ikerbasque researcher in the Department of Theoretical Physics of the UPV/EHU, together with Sandor Molnar of the National Taiwan University and visiting Ikerbasque researcher at the UPV/EHU in 2013, have conducted a simulation that explains the collision between two clusters of galaxies. Clusters of galaxies are the biggest objects that exist in the universe. They are collections of hundreds of thousands of galaxies pulled together by gravity. [More]

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