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AMS Detector on ISS Measures Sum Flux of Cosmic Rays Electrons and Positrons

AMS Detector on ISS Measures Sum Flux of Cosmic Rays Electrons and Positrons

Latest results of the measurement of high-energy particles with the AMS detector on the international space station ISS provide for a deeper understanding of the origin and nature of cosmic rays. A young investigator group of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), which is headed by Dr. Iris Gebauer, is involved in this experiment. It measured the sum flux of cosmic rays electrons and positrons. The spokesperson of the AMS project, Professor Samuel C. C. Ting, presented the results at the CERN Research Center last week. [More]
Moon to be Turned into a Giant Particle Detector

Moon to be Turned into a Giant Particle Detector

Scientists from the University of Southampton are to turn the Moon into a giant particle detector to help understand the origin of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) cosmic rays - the most energetic particles in the Universe. [More]
NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory Successfully Produces Bose-Einstein Condensate

NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory Successfully Produces Bose-Einstein Condensate

NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) mission has succeeded in producing a state of matter known as a Bose-Einstein condensate, a key breakthrough for the instrument leading up to its debut on the International Space Station in late 2016. [More]
Optical Engineering Features Single-Photon Detection, Generation, and Applications

Optical Engineering Features Single-Photon Detection, Generation, and Applications

A new special section on single-photon detection, generation, and applications in Optical Engineering highlights research on technologies with applications in areas as diverse as space exploration and quantum computing, furthering the field by providing more accurate measurement methods and new analysis techniques. The peer-reviewed journal is published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, in print and in the SPIE Digital Library. [More]
Fusion of Electricity and Magnetism in a Single Material Paves Way for Advanced Computing Architectures

Fusion of Electricity and Magnetism in a Single Material Paves Way for Advanced Computing Architectures

Electricity and magnetism rule our digital world. Semiconductors process electrical information, while magnetic materials enable long-term data storage. A University of Pittsburgh research team has discovered a way to fuse these two distinct properties in a single material, paving the way for new ultrahigh density storage and computing architectures. [More]
Magnets Steer Particles at Swiss Light Source Accelerator Facility

Magnets Steer Particles at Swiss Light Source Accelerator Facility

Magnets are the unsung heroes in particle accelerators because they keep protons or electrons on track. But such magnets have very little in common with the small ones on the domestic fridge door. Quite a few of the magnets at PSI are heavier and bulkier than the fridge itself, yet despite this they are also masterpieces of precision and control. [More]
Galaxy DDO 68 May Not be as Young as it Looks

Galaxy DDO 68 May Not be as Young as it Looks

Astronomers usually have to peer very far into the distance to see back in time, and view the Universe as it was when it was young. This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of galaxy DDO 68, otherwise known as UGC 5340, was thought to offer an exception. This ragged collection of stars and gas clouds looks at first glance like a recently-formed galaxy in our own cosmic neighbourhood. But, is it really as young as it looks? [More]
Information Stored in Quantum Bits Exponentially Compressed Without Losing Information

Information Stored in Quantum Bits Exponentially Compressed Without Losing Information

CIFAR researchers have shown that information stored in quantum bits can be exponentially compressed without losing information. The achievement is an important proof of principle, and could be useful for efficient quantum communications and information storage. [More]
New Approach to Make Macroscopic Mechanical Resonators to Exhibit Quantum Mechanical Behavior

New Approach to Make Macroscopic Mechanical Resonators to Exhibit Quantum Mechanical Behavior

EPFL researchers find a new method for the preparation of non-classical states of a mechanical oscillator. [More]
Low-Noise Mechanical Oscillators Hold Promise for Experiments in Quantum Physics

Low-Noise Mechanical Oscillators Hold Promise for Experiments in Quantum Physics

A new step is being taken in the development of ultra-stable sensors of small forces. EPFL researchers have found a way to eradicate external perturbations from interfering with their state-of-the art optomechanical measurement systems. [More]
Miniaturized Optical Frequency Combs Help Achieve Terabit Data Transmission

Miniaturized Optical Frequency Combs Help Achieve Terabit Data Transmission

Scientists from EPFL and KIT have achieved data transmissions on a terabit scale with a single laser light frequency using miniaturized optical frequency combs. The findings open the way for using this system in future high-speed communication systems. [More]
Researchers Propose New Quantum Mechanics Tests at the Macroscopic Scale

Researchers Propose New Quantum Mechanics Tests at the Macroscopic Scale

Scientists at the University of Geneva (UniGe) and at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) propose a scheme to probe non-classical states of macroscopic systems. [More]
Most Stars Formed When Unstable Clusters of Newly Formed Protostars Broke Up

Most Stars Formed When Unstable Clusters of Newly Formed Protostars Broke Up

New modeling studies from Carnegie’s Alan Boss demonstrate that most of the stars we see were formed when unstable clusters of newly formed protostars broke up. These protostars are born out of rotating clouds of dust and gas, which act as nurseries for star formation. Rare clusters of multiple protostars remain stable and mature into multi-star systems. The unstable ones will eject stars until they achieve stability and end up as single or binary stars. The work is published in The Astrophysical Journal. [More]
Cryogen-Free Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator to Help Study Quantum Information Science

Cryogen-Free Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator to Help Study Quantum Information Science

A physicist in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences has received a major grant to support ongoing work in quantum information science. [More]
Elements Ejected from First Supernovae Linked to Elemental Abundance in Iron-Poor Stars

Elements Ejected from First Supernovae Linked to Elemental Abundance in Iron-Poor Stars

A team of researchers, led by Miho N. Ishigaki, at the Kavli IPMU, The University of Tokyo, pointed out that the elemental abundance of the most iron-poor star can be explained by elements ejected from supernova explosions of the universe's first stars. Their theoretical study revealed that massive stars, which are several tens of times more immense than the Sun, were present among the first stars. [More]

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