Quantum Computing News RSS Feed - Quantum Computing

Quantum Processors Could Work More Slowly Than Believed

Quantum Processors Could Work More Slowly Than Believed

If you're designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have narrowed the theoretical limits for where that "speed limit" is. The research implies that quantum processors will work more slowly than some research has suggested. [More]
CQT's Quantum Cryptography Research Featured in National University of Singapore Exhibition

CQT's Quantum Cryptography Research Featured in National University of Singapore Exhibition

CQT's research in quantum cryptography is featured in a National University of Singapore exhibition, organised as part of the celebrations for the University's 110th anniversary and Singapore's 50th birthday. [More]
Quantum Information Encoded in Silicon Using Simple Electrical Pulses Holds Promise for Affordable Quantum Computers

Quantum Information Encoded in Silicon Using Simple Electrical Pulses Holds Promise for Affordable Quantum Computers

A UNSW-led research team has encoded quantum information in silicon using simple electrical pulses for the first time, bringing the construction of affordable large-scale quantum computers one step closer to reality. [More]
New Molecule Created with Large Permanent Dipole Moment

New Molecule Created with Large Permanent Dipole Moment

A proposed pathway to construct quantum computers may be the outcome of research by a University of Oklahoma physics team that has created a new molecule based on the interaction between a highly-excited type of atom known as a Rydberg atom and a ground-state atom. A unique property of the molecule is the large permanent dipole moment, which reacts with an electric field much like a bar magnet reacts with a magnetic field. [More]
Bristol Researchers Demonstrate Quantum Teleportation on a Silicon Chip

Bristol Researchers Demonstrate Quantum Teleportation on a Silicon Chip

The core circuits of quantum teleportation, which generate and detect quantum entanglement, have been successfully integrated into a photonic chip by an international team of scientists from the universities of Bristol, Tokyo, Southampton and NTT Device Technology Laboratories. [More]
Direct Coupling of Quantum Dots and Trapped Ions May Help Advance Development of Quantum Computers

Direct Coupling of Quantum Dots and Trapped Ions May Help Advance Development of Quantum Computers

Physicists at the Universities of Bonn and Cambridge have succeeded in linking two completely different quantum systems to one another. In doing so, they have taken an important step forward on the way to a quantum computer. [More]
WSU Encryption Code Could Fend Off Hacking Power of a Quantum Computer

WSU Encryption Code Could Fend Off Hacking Power of a Quantum Computer

Washington State University mathematicians have designed an encryption code capable of fending off the phenomenal hacking power of a quantum computer. [More]
Certain Kinds of Correlations do Imply Causation in Quantum World

Certain Kinds of Correlations do Imply Causation in Quantum World

Contrary to the statistician's slogan, in the quantum world, certain kinds of correlations do imply causation. [More]
Researchers Demonstrate Very High Speed Quantum Switch with Silicon

Researchers Demonstrate Very High Speed Quantum Switch with Silicon

The team demonstrated a quantum on/off switching time of about a millionth of a millionth of a second - the fastest-ever quantum switch to be achieved with silicon and over a thousand times faster than previous attempts. [More]
Orbital Angular Momentum for Encoding Information Increases Possibility of High-Dimensional Quantum Key Distribution

Orbital Angular Momentum for Encoding Information Increases Possibility of High-Dimensional Quantum Key Distribution

Researchers at the University of Rochester and their collaborators have developed a way to transfer 2.05 bits per photon by using "twisted light." This remarkable achievement is possible because the researchers used the orbital angular momentum of the photons to encode information, rather than the more commonly used polarization of light. [More]