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New Invention Revolutionizes Quantum-Limited Heat Conduction

New Invention Revolutionizes Quantum-Limited Heat Conduction

Heat conduction is a fundamental physical phenomenon utilised, for example, in clothing, housing, car industry, and electronics. Thus our day-to-day life is inevitably affected by major shocks in this field. The research group, led by quantum physicist Mikko Möttönen has now made one of these groundbreaking discoveries. This new invention revolutionizes quantum-limited heat conduction which means as efficient heat transport as possible from point A to point B. This is great news especially for the developers of quantum computers. [More]
Quantum Properties of Light Could Help Create Novel Technology to Improve Internet Security

Quantum Properties of Light Could Help Create Novel Technology to Improve Internet Security

Imagine communicating with your bank, the IRS or your doctor by way of an Internet that was perfectly secure. Your most private data would be protected with absolute certainty and, better yet, if any bad actor were to try to eavesdrop you would know immediately. Such is the promise of secure quantum communication. [More]
Researchers Develop New Approach that Uses Quantum Computers to Handle Massive Digital Datasets

Researchers Develop New Approach that Uses Quantum Computers to Handle Massive Digital Datasets

From gene mapping to space exploration, humanity continues to generate ever-larger sets of data — far more information than people can actually process, manage, or understand. [More]
Bristol Professor to Outline Current Status and Potential Applications of Quantum Computing at WEF

Bristol Professor to Outline Current Status and Potential Applications of Quantum Computing at WEF

Quantum computing will change lives, society and the economy and a working system is expected to be developed by 2020 according to a leading figure in the world of quantum computing, who will talk tomorrow Jan. 21, 2016 at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland. [More]
First Experimental Observations of Knots in Quantum Matter

First Experimental Observations of Knots in Quantum Matter

Knot solitons, or knotted solitary waves, have been successfully created in a quantum-mechanical field that describes a gas of superfluid atoms, known as Bose-Einstein condensate. [More]
New Way to Affect Dynamical Nonlocality in Nanoscale Quantum Circuits

New Way to Affect Dynamical Nonlocality in Nanoscale Quantum Circuits

Researchers at the MESA+ research institute at the University of Twente have identified a new fundamental quantum mechanical property of electrical currents in nanoscale quantum circuits. [More]
NIST Develops New Mixed-Atom Gates for Quantum Computing

NIST Develops New Mixed-Atom Gates for Quantum Computing

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have added to their collection of ingredients for future quantum computers by performing logic operations--basic computing steps--with two atoms of different elements. This hybrid design could be an advantage in large computers and networks based on quantum physics. [More]
New Class of Topological Insulators Shows Promise for Spintronics, Quantum Computing

New Class of Topological Insulators Shows Promise for Spintronics, Quantum Computing

Topological insulators are materials that let electric current flow across their surface while keeping it from passing it through their bulk. This exotic property makes topological insulators very promising for electricity with less energy loss, spintronics, and perhaps even quantum computing. [More]
MIT Professor Explains Google’s New Quantum-Computing Paper

MIT Professor Explains Google’s New Quantum-Computing Paper

In 2010, a Canadian company called D-Wave announced that it had begun production of what it called the world’s first commercial quantum computer, which was based on theoretical work done at MIT. [More]
Quantum Computer Could Solve Insoluble Problems Even When Travelling Along 'Open Timelike Curves'

Quantum Computer Could Solve Insoluble Problems Even When Travelling Along 'Open Timelike Curves'

Why send a message back in time, but lock it so that no one can ever read the contents? Because it may be the key to solving currently intractable problems. That's the claim of an international collaboration who have just published a paper in npj Quantum Information. [More]