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OIST Researchers Identify System that Can Store Quantum Information for Longer Times

OIST Researchers Identify System that Can Store Quantum Information for Longer Times

Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have identified a system that could store quantum information for longer times, which is critical for the future of quantum computing. This study was recently published in Physical Review Letters. [More]
Microwaves Freeze Single Atoms to Advance Quantum Technology Devices

Microwaves Freeze Single Atoms to Advance Quantum Technology Devices

Physicists at the University of Sussex have found a way of using everyday technology found in kitchen microwaves and mobile telephones to bring quantum physics closer to helping solve enormous scientific problems that the most powerful of today's supercomputers cannot even begin to embark upon. [More]
Chalmers MC2 Organizes QESS2015 Summer School on Quantum Simulation and Computation

Chalmers MC2 Organizes QESS2015 Summer School on Quantum Simulation and Computation

110 participants and 14 prominent lecturers gathered for the QUTE-EUROPE Summer School 2015 on 21-27 June at Hindåsgården. Göran Wendin, professor of theoretical physics at the Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience - MC2 - is chairman of the local organizing committee. We got the chance to ask a few questions about the event. [More]
Quantum Process Tomography Helps Characterize Unknown Quantum Processes

Quantum Process Tomography Helps Characterize Unknown Quantum Processes

Scientists and engineers from the University of Bristol, UK, and the Centre for Quantum Technologies in Singapore have published work in the June issue of Optica. They demonstrate a new protocol for estimating unknown optical processes, called unitary operations, with precision enhanced by the unique properties of quantum mechanics. This could lead to both dramatically better sensors for medical research and new approaches to benchmark the performance ultra-powerful quantum computers. [More]
Highly Stable, Squeezed Schrödinger Cats Hold Promise for Quantum Computers

Highly Stable, Squeezed Schrödinger Cats Hold Promise for Quantum Computers

Quantum physics is full of fascinating phenomena. Take, for instance, the cat from the famous thought experiment by the physicist Erwin Schrodinger. The cat can be dead and alive at once, since its life depends on the quantum mechanically determined state of a radioactively decaying atom which, in turn, releases toxic gas into the cat's cage. As long as one hasn't measured the state of the atom, one knows nothing about the poor cat's health either - atom and kitty are intimately "entangled" with each other. [More]
Researchers Develop New Quantum Error Correcting Code

Researchers Develop New Quantum Error Correcting Code

Quantum computers are largely theoretical devices that could perform some computations exponentially faster than conventional computers can. Crucial to most designs for quantum computers is quantum error correction, which helps preserve the fragile quantum states on which quantum computation depends. [More]
Swing-Dancing' Electrons Could Help Develop New Quantum Devices

Swing-Dancing' Electrons Could Help Develop New Quantum Devices

A research team led by the University of Pittsburgh's Jeremy Levy has discovered electrons that can "swing dance." This unique electronic behavior can potentially lead to new families of quantum devices. [More]
Researchers Design and Operate Working Superconducting Qubit Devices

Researchers Design and Operate Working Superconducting Qubit Devices

Professor Oleg Astafiev, jointly appointed Professor at Royal Holloway and Visiting Professor at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and his team of researchers, have designed, built and operated the first working superconducting qubit devices in the UK. [More]
Topological State of New Family of Materials can be Observed Directly

Topological State of New Family of Materials can be Observed Directly

They are 'strange' materials, insulators on the inside and conductors on the surface. They also have properties that make them excellent candidates for the development of spintronics ('spin-based electronics') and more in general quantum computing. However, they are also elusive as their properties are extremely difficult to observe. [More]
A Single Nuclear Spin Could Possibly be Detected at Room Temperature

A Single Nuclear Spin Could Possibly be Detected at Room Temperature

For the first time, a researcher at the University of Waterloo has theoretically demonstrated that it is possible to detect a single nuclear spin at room temperature, which could pave the way for new approaches to medical diagnostics. [More]